Bobby Flay Buttermilk Mashed Potatoes

Everyone has their own idea on how mashed potatoes should be made. I love them as sorts of ways, chunky, smooth, creamy, smoky, cheesy, etc. I would love to try out everyone’s different methods. Each Thanksgiving I make sure to look out for another mashed potatoes recipe to try. This year I selected Bobby Flay’s Mashed Potatoes with Buttermilk. This recipe was from the new Thanksgiving special, Thanksgiving at Bobby’s, which replaced Thankgiving Live this year.

Check out some other mashed potato recipes I have tested from different Food Network personalities.

Click here to view the entire recipe.

Bobby Flay Buttermilk Mashed Potatoes

Below you will find my cooking notes for this recipe:

1. I followed the recipe almost perfectly with one exception. I had to leave out the green onions. I can’t stand them. It always drive me nuts when you order something and they dump green onions all over it. But I do not think that this omission disqualifies me from telling you what I thought of the texture of the potatoes and the flavor with the buttermilk in it.

2. I didn’t even need close to the amount of buttermilk called for. If I would have added even the low estimate I would have had soup. I had the same issue last year when I tried his Smoked Paprika Mashed Potatoes. That one I wasn’t as careful with. Just slowly add the buttermilk until it’s the consistency you want.

3. The recipe calls for you to warm up the buttermilk mixture. This is important because then you aren’t adding cold dairy to your hot potatoes, especially if you are going to serve them immediately.

4. I love the flavor the buttermilk brings to the party. It’s a simple replacement for just using milk, yet add so much more flavor. Just as buttermilk does with pancakes and biscuits. Sometimes I skip it when I don’t have any on hand, but when I do go for it I was always satisfied that I did.

5. Running the potatoes through the food mill was simple and helped produce a better texture than just using a regular potato masher. You are less likely to overwork the potatoes making them gummy. You can also use a potato ricer (read my post on why to use a potato ricer). It is a little more work but I think it does an even better job.

I absolutely love the buttermilk in the mashed potatoes. They still do not top my favorite mashed potatoes recipe ever, Alton Brown’s Whipped Potatoes, but these are quicker and easier to make that than recipe. I definitely would make these again, but under no circumstance will I ever add green onions! Leeks on the other hand 🙂

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I'm Eric. I live in Ann Arbor, MI with my wife, 3 kids, and a flock of ducks. I love grocery shopping, trying new fruits, farmer's market, and traveling.
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