365 Organic Barbeque Sauces

I love it when my love for food and geography can come together. Whenever I see those posts online about each state’s regional food, I enjoy clicking through them (while being annoyed I have to click an arrow and wait to see the next one). I want to spend more time researching regional foods. One thing I have selected to learn more about his barbecue sauce. In different parts of the country, different types of sauces are present. As part of this research project, I wanted to take a look at how sauces from different regions are re-created to sell at the grocery store. I decided to pick up 3 organic 365 brand sauces from Whole Foods Market. Each sauce is based on a different region – Memphis, Kansas City, and Texas. While not expecting these to be as good a a homemade sauce, I wanted to see what the perspective on the difference in each type of sauce.

Let’s start by looking at the ingredient list of each sauce. I put in italics some ingredients I want to highlight.

365 Organic Barbeque Sauces

Kansas City Love – Thick and Sweet
Tomato Paste
Water
Apple Cider Vinegar
Brown Sugar
White Vinegar
Cane Sugar
Jalapeno Puree
Paprika
Salt
Garlic Puree
Cayenne Pepper
White Pepper
Onion Powder
Spice Blend

The first ingredient on this list is tomato paste. When people think of barbecue sauces, the Kansas City style is what most people think of – heavy on the tomato. Tomato is definitely the thing that dominates the flavor. It is a thick sauces that sits atop of the meat. There is some heat to it, but gentle heat.

365 Organic Barbeque Sauces

Memphis Madness – Tangy, Sweet, and Spicy
Apple Cider Vinegar
Water
Brown Sugar
Tomato Paste
Paprika
Salt
Mustard Powder
Soy Sauce
Onion Powder
Xanthan Gum
Jalapeno Puree
Molasses
Spice Blend
Cane Sugar
Lemon Juice
Tamarind
Cayenne Pepper
Allspice
Cloves
Caramel color
Garlic powder
Natural anchovy flavor
Lemon extract
Ginger oil
Orange extract
Capsicum extract
Natural onion flavor

The first ingredient on this list is apple cider vinegar. Memphis sauces tend to be similar to the Kansas City style but with more vinegar, which is definitely the case here. The Memphis sauce had molasses where the Kansas City does not. You could taste the spices more in this sauce than the other two.

365 Organic Barbeque Sauces

Texas True – Savory and Tangy
Water
Tomato Paste
Apple Cider Vinegar
Cane Sugar
Molasses
White Vinegar
Tamarind
Soy Sauce
Salt
Black Pepper
Cayenne Pepper
Cumin
Allspice
Cloves
Chili Powder
Onion
Lemon juice
Caramel color
Garlic powder
Natural anchovy flavor
Lemon extract
Ginger oil
Xantham Gum
Orange Extract
Capsicum extract
natural onion flavor

The first ingredient on this list is water. Out of the three sauces this one was easily the thinnest. Good for when you want it to soak into the meat. The Texas sauce is influenced by it’s proximity to Mexico which is why you find tamarind and cumin in it. It has a good amount of heat to it – more so than the KC sauce. I would have liked to have the cumin flavor make a bigger impact. It is less sweet than the KC sauce.

From this experiment it is easy to see the basic in the different styles of sauces – thickness, tomato ratio, vinegar ratio. It’s a good start for me on my journey to understand regional sauces. These bottled sauces don’t necessarily capture on the nuances of each style, which is what I hope to do when I try to make my very own versions.

My favorite was probably the Memphis Madness. It has the most balanced flavor profile. You could taste the spices better, I think that the KC, which is so strong on the tomato. The Texas True was my least favorite. My personal preference is towards a thicker sauce but also the flavor was more watery down in general.

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Organic Produce at Costco

There is no doubt that the organic trend is here to stay. More and more people are striving to buy only organic. Yet there is still a lot of people that don’t buy organic because they simply cannot afford it or they don’t want to pay the increased cost. Time magazine recently reported that a lot of consumers believe that organic labels are just an excuse to charge more. Clearly cost is clearly an issue when it comes to shopping for organic, that brings me to the topic of today’s post – if you are a Costco member, can this membership make organic produce more affordable for you? During my April 2015 visit to Costco, I recorded what kind of organic produce they had and the prices of that. Kept in mind, produce price vary a lot based on season, particularly something like berries.


Fruit/vegetable, price
Strawberries 16 oz, $3.99
Blueberries 6 oz, $4.88
Blackberries 12 oz, $7.98
Bananas, $.66/lb
Gala apples, $1.99/lb
Peeled carrots, $1.20/lb
Whole carrots, $.70/lb for 10 pound bag
Romaine hearts, $4.49 for 6 count bag
Earthbound Farms 1 pound salads, $4.49
Earthbound Farms Power Green in 1.5 pound bag, $3.66/lb

Organic Produce Costco

Some of the organic containers of berries at Costco are larger sizes than your normally find. The blackberries came in a 12 oz clamshell where most stores sell the 6 oz clamshell. Costco had the usual Driscoll’s berries. You can tell whether they are organic just by looking at the color of the label, a green label means organic, and a yellow label means conventional. Simple!

Organic Produce Costco

They also had berries from Naturipe. The prices of blueberries is one that wildly changes. Going into summer, expect lower prices, going into the winter, expect higher prices and small containers.

Organic Produce Costco

Costco also sells products from Earthbound Farms, a huge organic operation out of Central California. Their stuff is everywhere. Costco sells 10 pounds bags of carrots that would be great for juicing for the low price of 70 cents per pound.

Organic Produce Costco

They also have the 1 pound clamshells of organic baby spinach. One thing they had that I haven’t seen elsewhere is the 1.5 pound bags of Power Greens, which is a combination of baby kale, baby swiss chard, and baby spinach – one of my favorite salad mixes and at what works out to $3.66 a pound, it is also the cheapest I have seen this mix going for. It’s excellent for salads – also for juicing or on a pizza for a healthier dinner.

How Does the Price of Organic Produce at Costco Compare to Whole Foods?
Whenever we talk organic, we just have to bring up Whole Foods Market. They played a huge roll in bringing the organic movement to the forefront and they offer more varieties of organic produce that anyone else (keep in mind NOT all of Whole Foods produce is organic!) Their selection will beat Costco every time. You can get a lot of basic produce items at Costco and the prices are cheaper. For example, organic bananas at Whole Foods cost $.99/lb where they are $.66/lb at Costco or Earthbound Farms 1 pound salads are $5.99 at Whole Foods and $4.49 at Costco. But I didn’t find organic beets, leeks, onions, celery, swiss chard, sweet potatoes, etc. If you are an organic shopper take advantage of Costco’s savings while taking advantage of the Whole Foods selection.

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Costco Turkey Thanksgiving Prices 2015

As you are pursuing your options for this year’s Thanksgiving bird, one of the factors you must consider is whether or not to get an organic turkey. You know while you would want to buy organic fruit or vegetables, to avoid food from trees sprayed with pesticides. But they certainly don’t spray pesticides directly on turkeys. So wouldn’t all turkeys be organic? The USDA are certain requirements that turkey or any poultry must be to be certified organic. As you read them you will see why all turkeys are not organic.

Organic Turkey

“Farmers and ranchers must accommodate the health and natural behavior of their animals year-round. For example, organic livestock must be:
– Generally, managed organically from the last third of gestation (mammals) or second day of life
(poultry).
– Allowed year-round access to the outdoors except under specific conditions (e.g., inclement weather).
– Raised on certified organic land meeting all organic crop production standards.
– Raised per animal health and welfare standards.
– Fed 100 percent certified organic feed, except for trace minerals and vitamins used to meet the animal’s nutritional requirements.
– Managed without antibiotics, added growth hormones, mammalian or avian byproducts, or other prohibited feed ingredients (e.g., urea, manure, or arsenic compounds).

(To read more visit the USDA’s website)

The two biggest things here is that the turkey is raised on organic land and fed 100% organic feed. What goes in the turkey need to be organic. If you are eating the turkey you are eating what the turkey ate indirectly. If that concerns you, you may want to consider an organic turkey.

In mass production of turkeys at places that are more like factories than farms, turkeys are fed a diet high in grain and corn without the food they would get if they were allowed to roam free. The cheap feed in all likelihood is going to have been treated with pesticides when growing and if it’s corn or soy is going to be genetically modified corn or soy. The chemicals they ingest can end up building up in their fatty tissues, which you then eat. Yummmy!

Antibiotics Used in Poultry Production
Another thing to be concerned about is antibiotics. When living in such tight quarters, sickness and disease is more likely. So the poultry is given antibiotics in their feed to “protect them” and any remnants of the antibiotics that remains in their system we digest. A turkey cannot be given antibiotics if it is to be considered organic.

Know Where Your Food Comes From
Just because a turkey is not organic doesn’t mean that it was fed “toxic sludge” it’s whole life. This is where getting to know where your food comes from is important. If you have concerns, express them to whoever produces the turkey you want to buy. If you don’t get the answers you want, move on. There is plenty of time now before Thanksgiving to ask these questions.

A Word About Growth Hormones
Whether organic or not, all turkeys grown in the US must be done so without given growth hormones. That practice is illegal, no matter how you raise your bird. So when that is listed on the packaging for a turkey is really isn’t telling you anything you didn’t already know.

How Much Does an Organic Turkey Cost?
It would be easy to buy organic if money is not object, but for many of us that is not the case. The cheapest organic turkeys I found where going for $3.99 per pound. A 15-pound bird is going to set you back $59.85. Until we can increase the demand for organic turkey and find ways to make producing them cheaper without sacrificing the organic integrity, the prices are going to be too high for a lot of Americans. Don’t feel guilty if that is the case.

Look for Antibiotic Free Turkeys
If you can’t go organic this year, maybe you can at least try to avoid turkeys given antibiotics. Select Whole Foods stores carry Nature’s Rancher turkeys that are antibiotic free, even though they are not certified organic. They go for $2.49/pound in most stores, with a few select stores at an even cheaper $1.99/pound (check my Whole Foods Market turkey price list). Trader Joe’s turkeys are also antibiotic free. Shop around, see what you can find in your price range. Consider a smaller bird to save money. Smaller turkeys cook quicker anyway, which means less chance of drying them out.

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Costco Organic Chicken

The organic food industry has been booming over the last decade. A 2011 study done by the Organic Trade Association, reported a record 78% U.S. families buy organic food (see article in IndyStar). How many of those families are making organic meat choices? If you aren’t one of those families is it because price is an issue? In my ongoing mission to decide whether not it’s worth your money to buy a Costco membership – today we are going to look at what prices you would pay if you have a Costco membership for organic meat – specially chicken.

To read more about organic, check out my entire list of organic blog posts.

What is Organic Chicken?
What makes chicken organic? I went straight to the source for requirements for chicken to be certified USDA Organic (you can read the whole speal at the USDA website).

“Farmers and ranchers must accommodate the health and natural behavior of their animals year-round. For example, organic livestock must be:
– Generally, managed organically from the last third of gestation (mammals) or second day of life
(poultry).
– Allowed year-round access to the outdoors except under specific conditions (e.g., inclement weather).
– Raised on certified organic land meeting all organic crop production standards.
– Raised per animal health and welfare standards.
– Fed 100 percent certified organic feed, except for trace minerals and vitamins used to meet the animal’s nutritional requirements.
– Managed without antibiotics, added growth hormones, mammalian or avian byproducts, or other prohibited feed ingredients (e.g., urea, manure, or arsenic compounds).

Two main things most people are probably looking for here is that their fed is organic and the land they are raised on is certified organic.

What Type of Organic Chicken Does Costco Carry?
All the organic chicken I found at my local Costco was from Coleman Natural. They raise their birds all over the country on family farms. The farms are close by to their processing plants. They make frequent visits to the ranches/farms to be sure that their standards are being met, including testing to be sure no antibotics or hormones are given. The company was the first to bring chickens labeled free range and organic to the market.

How Much Does Organic Chicken Cost at Costco?
On my visit they only offered three types of chicken : whole fryer, drumsticks, and boneless skinless breasts. Here are the prices from my visit last month. For prices for the conventionally raised chicken, check out my Costco Chicken Prices post.

Chicken Type Price
Whole Fryer $2.49/lb
Unlike with the convential chicken the whole fryer is not the cheapest. You are going to pay $1.40 more per pound for the organic.
Drumsticks $1.99/lb
Love dark meat the best? Buy drumsticks. They are the cheapest way to get organic chicken at Costco. The bones can be saved up and used for making homemade chicken stock later.
Boneless Skinless Breasts $5.99/lb
This is where things get really pricey. It's twice as much money for the organic boneless skinless breasts. You save money if you buy a whole fryer and learn to cut it up yourself. This way you can get organic breasts for $2.49/lb plus you will have dark meat and bones for stock making. I posted some videos below to help you.

Here is a video that shows you how to cut a whole chicken to it’s parts.

In this video you will see how to de-bone chicken, so you can have boneless skinless chicken breasts for the cost of a fryer chicken. Make sure to save those bones for stock. Making homemade chicken stock will not only save you money but give you a great ingredient for soups, sauces, etc.

Organic chicken at Costco is reasonably priced. You are going to pay more for organic but if you take the time to butcher your own fryer than it is affordable. Or save money and time and just go with the drumsticks.

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Diva Apples

This is my third installment in a series of reviews of New Zealand grown apples that I found at Jungle Jim’s in Cincinnati, Ohio. The first two were the Breeze and Royal Joburn varieties. The final one of the series is the Diva apple. I have enjoyed getting to try new apples when we are far removed from apple season here.

The Diva apple was developed in Hawkes Bay, New Zealand, which is located on the east coast of the North Island. The climate there is dry and temperate. This area is renowned for it’s vineyards and orchards. The Diva apple is grown there by both conventional and organic means. The sample I purchased was organic. The other apples I mentioned with both conventional. It is available during late spring in the United States.

Diva Apples

The apple is a beautiful red color with light streaks of color and a round shape. The name “DIVA” goes along with the trend of giving apples short, 4 letter names – Jazz, Envy, Kiku, so and so. It’s easier to get the name boldly on the sticker of the fruit if you have a short name. From a marketing perspective it makes sense, although I don’t really love the name Diva.

Diva Apples

My Experience with this Apple (Rating Scale 1-10)

Aspect Score
Crispiness 8
Tartness 4
Apple Flavor 7
Sweetness 8
Juiciness 10
Where I Bought Them Jungle Jim's (Cincinnati OH)

Overall Feeling:
Every new apple that comes out seems to always be about two things – sweet and crisp with flavor being a distant third. I was thinking oh no not another sweet, crunchy, yet flavorless apple. This has some flavor along with a bit of acidity, so it’s more than drinking sugar water – try a Sonya apple if you want that experience. It’s super juicy. One of the juiciest apples I have ever had! Plenty of juice for juicing making.

I only purchased one of these apples to try as they were organic and imported so the price was high ($3.49 per pound).

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mango og

I am all about making wise choices when I am the grocery store. I don’t always just go the cheap route. They are other factors to consider. Generally people want to save money but at times other factors come up. Like whether something they are buying is organic or not. Many of you are willing to part with more money to get organic produce. I certainly want to avoid pesticides in my food whenever I can. But it is always the best move to go organic? I previously spoke of a list of fruit and vegetables that were considered to be the safest to eat non-organic – the clean 15. One of the items that falls on the list is the world’s most consumed fruit – the mango.

The first thing about a mango is that you do not eat the skin. So anything that is sprayed on a mango would have to make it to the actual fruit you eat. A report indicated that when mangos are tested for pesticides fever than 10% showed any residue from pesticides. Could be because of the thick skin or that growers aren’t using much if any pesticides on mangos.

Hot Water Treated
Most mangos whether organic or not are hot water treated. They are put in water that around 110 degrees. This is done to kill any fruit flies or pests. I have to wonder if this also contributes to the lower pesticide residue found on mangos since they are already washed. Check out this YouTube on the process of hot water treating mangos :

Why Organic Mangos May Not Be Any Safter
The assumption that organic fruit is safer than conventional fruit is even further challenged with this recent story. Purity Organic announced a recall of organic mangoes when the FDA reported a positive test for listeria. These particular mangoes were received in Arizona, California, Colorado, New Jersey and Texas. No reports of anyone being harmed by these mangoes as of yet. Still it goes to show that organic produce can have those same problems. The problem lies with our food coming from these huge farms and companies that are more factory than farm. Some tainted water or surface that gets unnoticed in such a huge facility and you suddenly have a huge outbreak such as the listeria cantaloupe outbreak in Colorado a few years back. This is why I recommend that you buy as much as you can from smaller, local farms and orchards, where those kinds of outbreaks are less likely just because it’s easier to monitor a smaller scale operation.

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No Organic Avocado

A lot of people are in the organic only mindset. They will buy produce that is only marked as organic. Seems like a good policy. Who wants to eat pesticides on their food? No one actually wants that. But are you spending your money wisely by sticking to an organic only rule? Recently I was asked about whether it was necessarily to buy organic avocados. The answer I found might surprise you, I hope it enlightens you to really examine the choices you are making and if they are worth your hard earned money.

By now most people have heard of the dirty dozen. These are fruits or vegetables that are highly recommend that you buy organic because they are the most likely to have or absorb pesticides. Here is the rundown.

celery
peaches
strawberries
apples
domestic blueberries
nectarines
sweet bell peppers
spinach, kale and collard greens
cherries
potatoes
imported grapes
lettuce

Avocados do not make that list. One thing those 12 items have in common is that you eat the whole thing, including the other skin, where pesticides may have directly touched. Of course you do not eat the skin of the avocado. Some still worry about it getting through the skin. But there is still another issue to be addressed. Think about this, farmers don’t just spray pesticides for the fun of it. They do it to improve the look and quantity of their crop. With some produce that is a waste of time and especially money. Farmers do not spray everything equally. Some things grow with less “problems”.

Take a look at the avocado. Not the prettiest fruit. No amount of spraying is going to make it look any better. The Environmental Working Group came out with a list of 15 produce items that are considered to be clean and contain the least amount of pesticides. Avocados are on that list.

Copper Used in Organic and Conventional Avocados
Whether the avocado is organic or conventional, both are sprayed with copper. This is used as a fungicide and is approved for organic use. Copper is essential to our diets as it helps keep our organs and metabolic processes working. Too much of a good thing is not good either. I would only be concerned if you eat more than a couple avocados every single day. At that point I would check up on your sources. If you live in a climate where avocados grown, try to buy them directly from the farmer and ask questions.

But I think when it comes to avocados you can rest more easily than you can with other fruits or vegetables and give your budget a break as well.

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Honeycrisp Apples on Tree

Where have all the organic apples gone? This is a question I hear a lot. People expect a place such as Whole Foods Market to be stock full of organic apples but if you have been there lately you probably didn’t see a lot of them. Organic apples are hard to come by right now. Not impossible just not in the quantities people are expecting. Is it because stores don’t really care about bringing them to their customers? No.

In this day and age people expect to have everything available to them all the time. It doesn’t always work that way. The problem here is that more and more people want organic. The supply is not meeting the demand. (Check out this report in the Packer, a produce industry newsletter). This is particularly the case with apples this year. The domestic apple crop was not big enough to meet the amount of people that wanted them for the 2013-2014 season.

Organic Michigan Strawberries

Now if more people want organic kale, then farms could try and plant more organic kale for the season. Not so with apples. It takes about 5 years for an apple tree to begin bearing any fruit. So if demand increases it will take time to meet up with that demand. Also you really only have one state that is growing most of the commercial organic apple crop, and that is Washington. You make see other states pop and now again, I have seen organic Michigan apples at Whole Foods, but most of the time we are relying on just Washington, so however their season goes will dedicate how the organic apple season across the country goes.

What Time of Year Can I Find Organic Apples?
We begin seeing organic apples out of Washington in September. As the harvest continues more varieties become available and a steady stream last into the winter. In late winter is when things start getting sketchy. In 2014, supplies start running low around late February to early March. Once organic apples begin harvesting in Southern Hemisphere you may seem them hitting U.S. stores in April and May. Not in the same amounts as the Washington crop. June to August you will find it even more of a hunt to find any organic apples before the new crop out of Washington arrives again.

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Friedas and Heirloom Orchards

Last week, I received another package from my friends at Frieda’s Specialty Produce. I was super excited to have the chance to try 3 new for me, yet very old varieties of organic heirloom apples grown at Heirloom Orchards in Hood River, Oregon. The wonderful thing about these 3 varieties – King David, Roxbury Russett, and Orleans Reinette is that they all look and taste different. I couldn’t have picked out better 3 better apples to taste together. This is my version of the perfect wine tasting. The really cool thing about each of these heirloom apple is the history behind them. Each have a story to tell that is captivating and full of American history. History buffs get ready for a blast through American’s apple past.

King David Apples

King David was discovered by Ben Frost in Arkansas in 1839. It was originally promoted in the late 19th century by the Stark Bros Nursery, one of the country’s most famous nurseries. It is likely a cross between a Jonathan and a Arkansas Black. We aren’t 100% sure as this was a chance seedling. The trees are able to perform well in warmer southern climates.

My Experience with this Apple (Rating Scale 1-10)

Aspect Score
Crispiness 7
Tartness 6
Apple Flavor 9
Sweetness 6
Juiciness 7

Overall Feeling: This apple had a very fruity taste, similar to a fruit punch drink that isn’t too sweet. I found notes of cherry in the flavor with a slightly spicy finish on the tongue. The apple has the perfect balance of sweet and tart. It might be the most perfectly balanced apple I have ever come across! It was crisp and juicy enough to be satisfying. A great apple for out of hand eating, also works well in juice or cider.

Orleans Reinette

This variety is even older than the King David. It is believed to have originated in France the same year our country was fighting for it’s independence!

My Experience with this Apple (Rating Scale 1-10)

Aspect Score
Crispiness 7
Tartness 6
Apple Flavor 10
Sweetness 5
Juiciness 4

Overall Feeling: Very complex taste, that will just blow your mind. It has the tart flavor of a good piece of citrus – something I have never experienced in an apple before. It finished with some nutty flavor. One of the best out of hand apple eating experiences I have had! There are reasons why this apple is not available on store shelves across this country. It does not keep that well and the trees don’t produce like most commercial varieties, so it’s not easy to find. The fun thing about buying heirlooms is that these apples are grown for the flavor, not for how much profit they can bring in. It’s a way I really appreciate and admire.

Roxbury Russet

Last up is the Roxbury Russett. I have had several Russet apples. These apples normally have brown coloring in their skin, much like that of a Russett potato. As you see in the picture above this apple doesn’t have a lot of brown, mostly green. With this particular variety the amount of “russeting” depends on the year. I have had Russets that were completely brown.

The really cool thing about this apple is that it may be the first apple ever developed in American history! The name “Roxbury” comes from the town of Roxbury in the Massachusetts Bay Colony where it was grown even before our independence in the early 17th century. This apple was also part of the famous Thomas Jefferson orchard at Monticello. Talk about an apple with a history – a history that I got to taste!

My Experience with this Apple (Rating Scale 1-10)

Aspect Score
Crispiness 6
Tartness 6
Apple Flavor 9
Sweetness 4
Juiciness 5

Overall Feeling: My wife described this apple as having a pure apple flavor. When you think of what an apple tastes like, this is the apple you are thinking of. It has such a clean, tart flavor, with enough sugar to it for out of hand enjoyment.

I am very appreciative of Frieda’s for sending me these organic heirloom apples. They were a delight to try. Check out the other apples they have send me. Here is a short list below of where you might purchase these apples. If you want to see a store in your area carry them, call your store and ask the produce manager about Organic Heirloom apples from Frieda’s. Make sure to check at any store that carries Frieda’s products. You can find stores that do by searching using their online store locator. If I receive more store information I will provide it here.

Store Listing
Sprouts in California and Nevada
Central Markets in Texas

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Cox's Orange Pippin

In the produce world, whenever the word “heirloom” is brought up, people start getting excited. They should be. Heirloom varieties are typically varieties that big commercial growers have passed on because they don’t have the shelf life or the look they say the consumer wants. Although now we are seeing the big growers starting to sell more heirloom tomatoes because people have requested them so much. When it comes to heirlooms it’s not tomatoes that I get excited about it’s apples. There are just so much varieties of apples out there, you will never try them all. It’s always a quest of mine to find heirloom that I haven’t tried before each fall. The quest was made easier this year thanks to my friends at Frieda’s Produce. They send me a package of heirloom varieties to try out. Even cooler is that these were Organic Heirlooms. Putting those two words in the same sentence is really going to get people excited!

Cortland Apples

The varieties that I received where:

Cox’s Orange Pippin – An popular English apple that is tart but with enough sweetness to enjoy out of hand. A flavorful apple that you can bake with.

Cortland – An apple developed in New York at the end of the 19th century. It’s a McIntosh cross, so has a similar flavor but stores a couple weeks longer without going soft. Better for applesauce than baking.

Ribston Pippin – A parent of the Cox’s Orange, this apple has been around since 1708! It has a high vitamin C content (30mg/100mg).

Here is a list of stores where you can purchase Organic Heirloom apples. If you want to see a store in your area carry them, call your store and ask the produce manager about Organic Heirloom apples from Frieda’s. Make sure to check at any store that carries Frieda’s products. You can find stores that do by searching using their online store locator. If I receive more store information I will provide it here.

Ribston Pippin

Store Listing
Sprouts in California and Nevada
Central Markets in Texas

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WELCOME TO MY BLOG

I'm Eric. I live in Ann Arbor, MI with my wife, 3 kids, and a flock of ducks. I love grocery shopping, trying new fruits, farmer's market, and traveling.
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