good_eats_logo An hour or two after people enjoy their turkey and sides on Thanksgiving they try to find room in their tummies for dessert. There is a pretty good chance that dessert is going to be pumpkin pie. Tonight on Good Eats, Alton Brown shared with us his version of the Thanksgiving classic. Alton started by pointing out that pumpkin pie is actually more American than apple pie. Pumpkin originated in North America, while apples ordinated overseas. He talked about 3 different types of pumpkins that are good for culinary use. The Dickinson pumpkin is a large pumpkin and is actually the one most often used in canned pumpkin puree. The second is the Jarrahdale from New Zealand. Last and his preferred pumpkin is the sugar pie pumpkin which you should be able to find in your local mega mart.

There were 3 recipes in this episode. I will talk a little bit about each of them. For the full recipes, visit Food Network’s website.

Baked Pumpkin Pie Soup
Soup isn’t exactly the first thing I expected to see in a pumpkin pie episode. This soup is baked in the oven and includes chicken broth, onion, garlic, cooking apple (he likes Braeburn), goat cheese and thyme. Baking a dish inside a pumpkin is a great creativity way to use pumpkins. I baked some oatmeal inside a pumpkin before and it turned out great.

Pumpkin Puree | Click here to read my full review of this recipe.
One of the biggest challenge is making your own pumpkin puree is getting that pumpkin open. Alton uses a cleaver with a mallet to split the pumpkin in half. Then he bakes the pumpkin at 400 degrees for 30-45 minutes, but not before adding kosher salt. The salt helps pull out moisture in the pumpkin. When I tried this myself it took me about 35 minutes. The pumpkin puree will last in the fridge for a week and in the freezer for 6 months.

Pumpkin Pie | Click here to read my full review of this recipe.
His pumpkin pie uses a ginger cookie crust along with the homemade pumpkin puree, mixed with some eggs, dark brown sugar, half and half, and nutmeg. It’s a pretty simple recipe. You could add additional spices if you want like cinnamon, ginger, or cloves. Alton gives a second option for his pie. You can bake them in small pie pans and when they are all ready to go, sprinkle on some brown sugar and pull out your trusty torch. Then you will have yourself a burlee pumpkin pie.

Overall a great show that hopefully will encourage more people to forget the can and instead reach for whole pumpkins. If you are looking for more uses for pumpkin puree, click here for more recipes.

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I'm Eric. I live in Ann Arbor, MI with my wife, 3 kids, and a flock of ducks. I love grocery shopping, trying new fruits, farmer's market, and traveling.
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