Roasted Chicken with Ramps

Recently I discovered ramps at a local grocery store (Produce Station). They are also called wild leeks and can add an onion/garlic flavor to a dish. Click here to read my post on what ramps are. Ramps go excellent with chicken.

Ingredients
1 whole fryer chicken (make sure to remove whatever is in the cavity, giblets, heart, etc.)
1 bunch of ramps (6-8 ramps)
olive oil
kosher salt
freshly ground black pepper
dried rosemary
dried tarragon
1 1/2 cups chicken broth (to make a sauce)

* NOTE * Get all your ingredients ready ahead of time so that there isn’t an cross-contamination. The last thing I want is for you to touch the chicken and then touch your containers of herbs to get them out for this recipe. Put everything you need in small bowls before you even touch your chicken and make sure to wash your hands before you touch anything else in your kitchen.

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Take your ramps and cut off the leaves, leaving the pink stem attached to the bulbs. Save the leaves for later use. Take the bulbs and drizzle some olive oil over them, then sprinkle kosher salt and black pepper over them.

Now place your chicken on a roasting pan. Using a pairing knife or kitchen shears, pull back the skin without removing it, over the breasts, thighs, and drumstick areas of the chicken. Place the ramps under the skin in these areas. Sprinkle some dried rosemary and tarragon over these same areas and the entire chicken.

Insert a probe thermometer into the breast on an angle, being careful not to hit any bone. Cook the chicken until the temperature reaches 165 degrees. The dark meat should be at 180, so make sure to check that too, and if the dark meat is not ready, put foil over the breast and cook until the dark meat hits 180.

Now to prepare the sauce. Take your roasting pan and place it over 2 burners. Add 1 1/2 cups of chicken broth. Scrap all the bits you can off the bottom of the pan and bring to a boil. Add the leaves from your ramps and cook for 2 minutes, then remove them. Simmer the sauce until it has been reduced to your desired thickness. Keep in mind that the more water that you lose, the more salty the sauce will be, so since my wife does not like things too salt and keep the sauce pretty thin.

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Comments for This Post

  1. Andrea June 28, 2010, 8:35 pm

    I am very happy to have found your blog 🙂 I happened upon you searching whether or not I can save Burpee peas I’ve grown, dry them out and plant them next year. Do you know if they will produce peas if they aren’t Heirloom Seeds?

    Wild Ramps grow around here. We usually eat them with pinto beans.
    I love the idea of using the Ramps to season a whole chicken. I usually cook my whole chickens in a Rotisserie Style in the Crockpot.. Recipe found in the middle of my blog post here: http://littlefrugalista.wordpress.com/2010/03/13/using-leftover-vegetables-easy-pie-crust-and-veggie-soup/

    Feel free to look around my blog http://www.littlefrugalista.wordpress.com I share a very similar philosophy to you where food is concerned.
    You may find the post I wrote on buying a grass fed cow interesting: http://littlefrugalista.wordpress.com/category/buying-our-half-of-a-cow/

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I'm Eric. I live in Ann Arbor, MI with my wife, 3 kids, and a flock of ducks. I love grocery shopping, trying new fruits, farmer's market, and traveling.
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