Organic Finger Lime Sugar Cookies

I love sugar cookies! There is something about that slightly crisp exterior and soft interior that is just a delight to me. Now most people only make them around Christmas time. It’s fun to grap the kids and some decorations and let them play with their food. Sugar cookies don’t just have to be for Christmas. I love playing around with my recipe throughout the year. One of my favorite flavors to add to a sugar cookie is citrus. When you add some zest it really ups the flavor ante. I recently received some Organic Finger Limes from Frieda’s Produce, giving me another excuse to bust out the sugar cookie recipe just as I did during Sumo Mandarin season.

Organic Finger Limes

Organic Finger Limes are small tiny limes that when you cut on open little small balls that look like caviar come bursting out. This citrus caviar provides a burst of lime flavor. The perfect thing to top off on my sugar cookies. Now you could use the zest of these finger limes in the cookie dough itself however the amount of work it would take to get the zest and the high risk I would take off some of my skin with my zester lead me to just using some regular store bought limes for zesting purposes.

These might be some of the best sugar cookies I ever made. Adding the finger limes to the icing on top adds such a brilliant lime flavor. When you bite into the finger lime you get an extra burst of lime flavor. As I was eating them I thought these taste pretty good and when I got that first bite with the finger limes in it, all I can say is WOW! Definitely the tasty use I found so far for these little limes.

Organic Finger Lime Sugar Cookies
 

Ingredients
For the cookie dough
  • 1½ cups powdered sugar, sifted
  • 1 cup (2 sticks) butter (slightly softened)
  • 1 egg
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2½ cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon cream of tartar
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt
  • zest of 1 lime
For the glaze
  • 3 cups powdered sugar
  • water
  • 8-10 finger limes

Instructions
Making the cookies
  1. In a mixing bowl, cream together the butter and powdered sugar.
  2. Mix in the egg, vanilla, and zest. Thoroughly combine.
  3. In another bowl, sift together the flour, baking soda, salt, and cream of tartar.
  4. Add the dry ingredients in batches to the creamed mixture until you have combined everything well.
  5. Cover and refrigerate the dough for at least 30 minutes. This is to harden up the fat so the cookies don’t spread too much.
  6. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees
  7. Cut the dough in half.
  8. Roll one half out onto a floured surface to around a quarter-inch thickness. Cut the cookies out with a round cookie cutter or what cookie cutter you like.
  9. Transfer cookies to a parchment or silicone lined half sheet pan. Do no more than 8 cookies on a pan.
  10. Bake for 10-14 minutes (depends on size of your cookie cutter) or until slightly browned.
  11. Allow to cool on a wire rack before glazing.
To glaze the cookies
  1. Mix together 1 tablespoon of water at a time the with powdered sugar. Mix and add water until you form a glaze that is spreadable without being too thick or too runny.
  2. Spread onto cookies as soon as they are cool enough to handle.
  3. Squeeze the “caviar” out of ½ of a finger lime per cookie. Work fast before the glaze dries so that the finger limes can stick.

 

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We’re getting ready to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day, and of course we had to make some cookies. Grace And Faithy love using sprinkles (they call them sparkles) whenever they can. We decided to make some shamrock shaped chocolate cookies with some green mint frosting sprinkles.I took the girls to our favorite cake decorating store Bakers Nook and they picked out some beautiful gold flecked sparkles to decorate with along with the green sugar and rainbow sprinkles we had at home. I used a piping bag with a star tip to frost the cookies, and the girls went to town at decorating! It is so much fun to watch a child create their own edible masterpiece, they get really into it!

Shamrock Sugar Cookies

Chocolate Shamrock Cookies with Mint Buttercream
 

Ingredients
For the cookie dough
  • 1½ cups powdered sugar, sifted
  • 1 cup (2 sticks) butter (slightly softened)
  • 1 egg
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • ½ cup cocoa powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon cream of tartar
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt
For the buttercream
  • 1 cup butter, room temperature
  • 4 cups powdered sugar
  • 6 drops peppermint oil
  • ⅛ teaspoon green food coloring paste
  • 1 tablespoon whole milk

Instructions
Making the cookies
  1. In a mixing bowl, cream together the butter and powdered sugar.
  2. Mix in the egg, vanilla, and zest. Thoroughly combine.
  3. In another bowl, sift together the flour, cocoa powder, baking soda, salt, and cream of tartar.
  4. Add the dry ingredients in batches to the creamed mixture until you have combined everything well.
  5. Cover and refrigerate the dough for at least 30 minutes. This is to harden up the fat so the cookies don’t spread too much.
  6. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees
  7. Cut the dough in half.
  8. Roll one half out onto a floured surface to around a quarter-inch thickness. Cut the cookies out with a Shamrock cookie cutter
  9. Transfer cookies to a parchment or silicone lined half sheet pan. Do no more than 6 cookies on a pan.
  10. Bake for 10-14 minutes or until slightly browned around the edges
  11. Allow to cool on a wire rack before frosting.
To make the buttercream
  1. Whip the butter until it’s fluffy.
  2. Incorporate the sugar 1 cup at a time.
  3. Add the oil and whip frosting until light and fluffy.
  4. Add milk as needed to get desired consistency

Notes
I prefer using paste food coloring. It has more vivid colors and doesn’t add moisture to the dough. You can find it at a good baking store or online. Use regular food color if you like.

 

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I have been really excited for the SUMO Mandarin season to arrive. I had this mandarin for the first time last year and was really impressed with it’s flavor and juiciness. The SUMO was developed over a 30 year period in Japan, by a man who wanted the ease of peeling of  a Satsuma mandarin and the size and juiciness of a California Navel orange. That is exactly what we have now. This season I wanted to try and do something with one of them, even thought it’s hard not to just want to gobble them all up as is. I love citrus flavors in cookies. Why not make a sugar cookie with the flavors of this awesome mandarin?

Some people might think sugar cookies are only for Christmas. We need not refrain from them the rest of the year, especially when you have some flavors out there that would work perfectly in one. These cookies use the SUMO in two ways. The zest goes into the cookie batter to provide a nice essence of orange flavor. The juice is mixed with powdered sugar to make a simple, yet bold tasting icing.

I used a Clementine in this shot showing I used it’s zest for top of the icing.

The recipe below uses just 1 SUMO. The recipe I use is inspired by a sugar cookie recipe from Paula Dean. I have made several changes.

SUMO Mandarin Sugar Cookie Recipe
Cookie
 

Ingredients
For the cookie dough
  • 1½ cups powdered sugar, sifted
  • 1 cup (2 sticks) butter (slightly softened)
  • 1 egg
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2½ cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon cream of tartar
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt
  • zest of 1 SUMO Mandarin
For the glaze
  • Juice of 1 SUMO Mandarin
  • 3 cups powdered sugar
  • Additional zest for garnish (optional)

Instructions
Making the cookies
  1. In a mixing bowl, cream together the butter and powdered sugar.
  2. Mix in the egg, vanilla, and zest. Thoroughly combine.
  3. In another bowl, sift together the flour, baking soda, salt, and cream of tartar.
  4. Add the dry ingredients in batches to the creamed mixture until you have combined everything well.
  5. Cover and refrigerate the dough for at least 30 minutes. This is to harden up the fat so the cookies don’t spread too much.
  6. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees
  7. Cut the dough in half.
  8. Roll one half out onto a floured surface to around a quarter-inch thickness. Cut the cookies out with a round cookie cutter or what cookie cutter you like.
  9. Transfer cookies to a parchment or silicone lined half sheet pan. Do no more than 8 cookies on a pan.
  10. Bake for 10-14 minutes (depends on size of your cookie cutter) or until slightly browned.
  11. Allow to cool on a wire rack before glazing.
To glaze the cookies
  1. Mix together the juice of 1 SUMO Mandarin with powdered sugar. Mix until you form a glaze that is spreadable without being too thick or too runny.
  2. Spread onto cookies as soon as they are cool enough to handle.
  3. Garnish with more zest if you like (like I did in my picture)

 

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I have never been a big fan of peanut butter. When it came to PB&J, I always said forget the PB, just give me lots of the J. To this day, I don’t like eating this stuff on it’s own. However there is a way to get me to eat it – pair it up with chocolate. I love Reese’s Peanut Butter cups (especially the dark chocolate ones). If there is enough chocolate to go along with it, I will eat the PB – no problem. One of my favorite ways to enjoy it with the chocolate besides the aforementioned Reese’s product is no bake cookies. I have been using my mom’s no bake cookie recipe for years. The other night I had the desire to make these cookies again. Only this time I wanted to come up with a recipe that is more mine. So what did I do. I found a recipe I liked on Food Network’s website. I know not exactly going out on my own there. However I did make some changes to this recipe to make it more mine. Thus my Extra Chocolaty & Crispy No Bake Cookies came out of my kitchen and onto the front page of my blog.

I wanted to up the ante with these cookies. I want them to be more chocolaty and more crispy. Here is how I accomplished these goals.

Extra Chocolaty
Why use 4 tablespoons of cocoa powder when you can use 5! But the real secret to making these extra chocolaty is the use of cacao nibs. Cocoa nibs are pieces of cocoa beans that have been roasted and hulled. The nibs are further processed to make chocolate bars. But you can find them just as they are in your supermarket. On their own they are pretty bitter and hard to eat without some sweetness. Adding them to the cookies will bring another burst of chocolaty goodness to the cookie. They are strong and expensive to purchase, but you only need 1/4 cup of them for the recipe.

Extra Crispy
Most no bake recipes with PB and chocolate call for quick oats. I don’t mind that at all. But I wanted to add a little more in the way of texture. I looked at the pantry and came out with some puffed Kamut cereal. Kamut is an ancient wheat variety that is twice as big as our modern day wheat. It is known for it’s rich nutty flavor. You can buy it as a puffed cereal. I replace 1 cup of the oats with 1 cup of the puffed Kamut. You could use another puffed cereal or crisp rice cereal if you like. I just like the idea of using something different and unexpected like Kamut.

Cooking Tips

A lot of recipes have you just bring your no bakes to a boil and then immediately remove. I think it’s better to let it get to a full rolling boil and let it boil without touching it for 2 whole minutes. This made for a firmer cookie. But if you go longer than that you might end up with a dry, crumbly cookie.

Get the cookies out of the pot as soon as possible. I used a #20 disher to easily remove them and make them even sizes for serving.

Have some wax paper ready for the cookies to go on. Wax paper helps the cookies not to stick. You can also use parchment paper. I don’t recommend it as it costs more money. Save the parchment for the oven.

Extra Chocolaty & Crispy No Bake Cookies
Cookies
 

Ingredients
  • 2 cups granulated sugar
  • 5 tablespoons cocoa powder
  • 1 stick butter
  • ½ cup whole milk
  • 1 cup smooth peanut butter
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 1½ cups quick oats
  • 1 cup puffed Kamut cereal
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt

Instructions
  1. Melt the butter in a bottom of large sauce pan.
  2. Add the sugar, salt, cocoa powder, and milk.
  3. Bring to a rolling boil over medium high heat.
  4. Allow to boil for 2 minutes without stirring
  5. Remove from the heat.
  6. Add the peanut butter, vanilla, oats, and puffed Kamut. Stir to combine.
  7. Quickly scoop the cookies out onto wax paper. They will set up fast, so work fast.
  8. Make them whatever size you like. I used an average sized disher to dispense my cookies.
  9. Allow to fully cool before enjoying.

 

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One of the best traditions associated with Christmas is the annual sugar cookie decoration. Each year I like to shake thing up a bit, trying different recipes or techniques. Last year I added some pink peppercorns to my sugar cookies that gave them a fruity slightly spicy bite. This year I decided to add freeze dried fruit to my icing. It all starts with the cookie dough itself and I wanted to give someone else’s recipe a spin. So I picked to make Paula Deen’s sugar cookies. I liked that her recipe contained powdered sugar and cream of tartar. While her recipe was actually featured in a wedding theme episode that are perfect for Christmas. Below you will find my notes from this recipe. Visit Food Network’s website to print out the full recipe.

1. I was concerned that the dough was going to be too dry at first, but just a little patience was needed.

2. I naturally used Christmas cookie cutters. I put 8 cookies on a sheet pan lined with a Slipat. I won’t recommend more than that as they do spread some. Chilling the dough before hand like instructed will help solidfy the butter, thus reducing spreading when baked.

3. The recipe says it makes 5 dozen cookies. Her cookie cutter must have been small as I had about 2 dozen.

4. The recommend 9 minute baking time worked perfect for me. It produced a cookie that had some bite on the outside but still was very tender on the inside. I am guessing if her cookies were smaller than were a lot more crunchy that mine.

5. I did not try her royal icing. I made my own icing using freeze dried fruit mixed with powdered sugar.

Overall I was very pleased with this recipe. It produced the kind of sugar cookie I liked. Firm enough to hold up to decorating by young kids but tender enough to please my palate. This recipe will find a place in my rotation. Kudos to Paula.

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Pumpkin Snickerdoodles

I am a big fan of soft and/or chewy cookies. I just can’t get enough of that texture! That love and the leftover pumpkin puree in my fridge lead me to search for a pumpkin cookie recipe to try. So why not a pumpkin snickerdoodle! I found a recipe at the blog, Pennies on a Platter.

Pumpkin Snickerdoodles

What is a Snickerdoodle?

It is a cookie made with flour, some type of fat, and sugar that is rolled in cinnamon sugar. These cookies are typically soft on the inside, which I adore! It’s origin is debated, could be German or a fancy cookie name that they came up with in New England.

Pumpkin Snickerdoodles

The cookie came out soft and delicious. I had a couple cookies with my dinner that I took to to work last week and I found that the pumpkin flavor seem to come out more when chilled. If I make these again I think I might up the spices used.

As part of “Pintober”, which is a YouTube challenge to create a video each day on something you have pinned on Pinterest, my wife made a video on these very cookies. You can see how my kids got involved with making the cookies. Check it out:

Pumpkin Snickerdoodles
 

Ingredients
For the cookies:
  • 1 cup unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • ½ cup light brown sugar
  • ¾ cup fresh pumpkin puree
  • 1 large egg
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 3¾ cups all purpose flour
  • 1½ teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
For the coating:
  • ½ cups granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon ground ginger
  • Dash of allspice

Instructions
  1. Start by beating room temperature butter in a mixer with both sugars until they are light and fluffy.
  2. Add the pumpkin puree, egg, and vanilla. Mix until integrated.
  3. In another mixing bowl combine flour, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, and nutmeg.
  4. With your mixer set to low (unless you like flour in your face!) slowly add the dry ingredients.
  5. Mix until everything just incorporated
  6. Cover and chill the dough in the fridge for about an hour. This will keep the cookies from spreading too much when baked off.
  7. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees
  8. Prepare sheet pans with parchment or a silicone liner.
  9. Scoop the dough on the pans. Try to get them to be in equal in size. A disher is the best tool for that job.
  10. Roll the dough in mixture of sugar, cinnamon, ginger, and allspice.
  11. Bake for 12 to 14 minutes
  12. Transfer to a wire rack for cooling after allowing them to rest on the pan for a couple minutes.

 

 

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Having made chocolate cookies that night before, I really didn’t plan on making another batch today. However when I was browsing my site analytics, I noticed that people were coming to the site (via my guide to chocolate weekend on Food Network) in search for info on Giada’s Double Chocolate & Mint cookies. So I look in the pantry and I head enough stuff to give this recipe a shot. I only planned on baking a few cookies and then freezing the rest to bake out later. Below you will find my notes from this recipe. For the full recipe, visit Food Network’s website.

1. I used a mix of different percentages of chocolate. I had various leftovers of different types but not enough to equal the 6 oz required. The chocolates ranged from 54% to 70%.

2. Giada used a double boiler to melt the choocolate and butter. I thought it would be easier to just use the microwave. I microwaves the chocolate and butter for 2 30-second intervals, stirring in between. Then I did it for 10 seconds until I had smooth chocolate.

3. The nice thing about this recipe is that you can mix it all by hand, without having to break out your hand or stand mixer.

4. I didn’t have any Andes mints on hand. However I did have a bag of Nestle Mint & Dark Chocolate Morsels. I used all of the mint morsels in the bag (about 4 oz), and then added .67 oz of the dark chocolate to equal the 4.67 oz of Andes mint called for in the recipe. I also left the morsels whole as I like chunks in my cookies.

5. Giada measured her cookies in a 1/4 cup measure. That makes for some large cookies. I decided to go just a bit smaller. So my bake time was more like 12-13 minutes, then the 18 the recipe estimates.

Although I made a few variations to the recipe, I didn’t do enough to really change the integrity of it. This is a quality chocolate cookie, with a nice touch of mint. Putting melted chocolate cookie along with cocoa powder, produces such a better result than a cookie recipe using cocoa powder alone. I will definitely try this recipe again, maybe next time with the Andes mints.

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Whenever Food Network airs a new episode of a cooking show, they almost always post recipes for the show a day or two before the show airs. On Thursday morning, I discovered what Alton Brown was making for the final episode of Good Eats, entitled “Turn on the Dark”. The recipe that immediately jumped out at me was his Chocapocalypse Cookies. Before the show aired, I set out to the grocery store to get all the supplies I needed. This cookie recipe includes several different types of chocolate: milk, 54%, 70%, 100%, and nib. Below you will find my notes from this recipe. Check out the full recipe at Food Network’s website.

1. My goal when at the grocery store was the find the exact percentages of chocolate the recipe called for. I ended up with chocolate made by several different companies:

Ghirardelli 100% Unsweetened Chocolate
Baker’s Semi-Sweet Chocolate (which is 54% cocoa)
Dove Milk Chocolate (don’t know the exact percentage)
Lindt 70% Chocolate

The recipes also calls for cocoa nibs. Unfortunately at the 2 stores I visited that night, I only found chocolate covered cocoa nibs. But these are perfectly fine for this recipe, as you are just folding them into the dough as is. You can buy plain cocoa nibs online.

2. I prepped all my ingredients before I began, including chopping all the chocolate, so that later on it would be easy to put everything together.

3. The first step is to melt the unsweetened and 54% chocolate in the microwave in a glass bowl. Alton said it would take about two 30 second intervals and maybe an additional 10 seconds. My microwave isn’t that powerful, so it took me about 10 second intervals after the initial minute to get to a smooth, melted chocolate.

4. I then let the chocolate cool for about 15 minutes or when it reached 90 degrees. I used my infrared thermometer to check the temperature. It really is a great tool to have when working with chocolate. So if you do a lot of work with chocolate, I would definitely recommend getting one.

5. Next it’s time to beat the sugar and butter together until it resembles wet sand, like in the picture above.

6. Then I added the eggs and vanilla extract until completely combined.

7. Then I added the melted chocolate, and mixed that until completely combined.

8. Then I added the flour mixture, slowing add it so I didn’t have flour flying back up in my face.

9. Finally, I added in the 70% chocolate, milk chocolate, and cocoa nibs. I just stirred them in with a spatula.

10. The dough has to go into the fridge for 45 minutes. Do not skip this step, otherwise your cookies will spread and form one big chocolate mass on your sheet pan. Be patient! I know it’s hard.

11. Alton used a 1 1/4-inch diameter disher to dispense his cookies. I do not know of these, so I had just used an ice cream scoop that I filled about half way. Not the most ideal method, but I didn’t end up having any problems. I did end up with less numbers of cookies than Alton. The recipe says 55, and I got about 29, so mine were a bit bigger.

12. I baked mine for exactly 8 minutes, rotating the pan half way through. The cookies came out perfect the first time. The cookies will come out looking wet and doughy. Resist the urge to put them back in. If your cookies look like mine do in the photo above, they are perfect. They will be set all around with some gooeyness in the middle. If you over bake them, they won’t taste good.

These cookies were absolutely amazing! Never had a chocolate cookie that was this powerful. They are not for the faint of heart! I will make these again, not everyday mind you as buying all that chocolate wasn’t cheap, so these were some of the more expensive cookies I ever made. But my taste buds, my wife, and kids all agree it was worth it. Thanks Alton for one last great cookie recipe!

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Whenever I think of Christmas cookies, the basic sugar cookie always comes to mind. The perfect canvas for some serious Christmas artwork. This year I wanted to jazz up some of my sugar cookies. Last year, I came across someone using pink peppercorns in their sugar cookies. That may sound strange, but pink peppercorn aren’t like black peppercorns. Yes they do a bit of a spicy bite, but they also have some fruity, berry like notes in their flavor, a nice addition to a sugar cookie indeed (check out my earlier post on peppercorns). I wanted to give that idea a try, but didn’t want to to full commitment. So I took a couple pinches of peppercorns, smashed them with a meat tenderizer and mixed them into some of my sugar cookie dough. I made about 8-9 cookies worth. They had a nice, spicy bite to them without being overwhelming, and the fruity like taste was a nice addition. So I invite you to give it a try yourself. I don’t have an exact recipe, although below you will find my sugar cookie recipe. If I do end up doing a full batch at some point, I will update this page with the amount of pink peppercorns I used.

Ingredients for my Basic Sugar Cookies
2 cups sugar
1 cup butter
2 eggs
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon lemon extract
6 teaspoons buttermilk
1 teaspoon baking soda
4 to 4 1/2 all-purpose flour

Cream together the butter and sugar. Then add all the rest of ingredients but the flour. Mix to fully integrate. Then add the flour 1 cup at a time. Depending on the conditions in your kitchen, you will need on average between 4 to 4 1/2 cups to bring this dough together. Once finished, I like to chill the dough for at least half an hour before rolling out the cookies.

Bake at 375 degrees for about 8-10 minutes. I like mine nice and soft, so sometimes I do less than that.

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Christmas time is a good excuse to make boatload of cookies. A homemade Christmas cookie is always welcomed as a present. I always have my eyes peeled for the next great cookie recipe. I have already made some cookies with chocolate and peppermint this year, so I was looking for a different flavor. I decided to check out Martha Stewart’s website to see if she had anything that I wanted to try. I am came across a recipe for crisp anise cookies. But I thought the cookies could use a little bit more flavor. So I decided to introduce some lemon zest. I prefer to use Meyer lemons when they are in season. I think they taste better than your traditional lemon. Martha Stewart played a role increasing the popularity of this lemon, so I thought it a very appropriate addition to one of her recipes. Click here for the original recipe. You will find my ingredients and instructions below.

Meyer Lemon Anise Cookies
 

Ingredients
  • 1½ cups plus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 teaspoons freshly ground anise seeds (I grind them in a coffee grinder)
  • the zest of 1 Meyer lemon
  • 4 large eggs, room temperature
  • 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar
  • coarse sugar for sprinkling

Instructions
  1. Place your eggs into the bowl of a stand mixer. Mix on medium speed.
  2. Then slowly add the sugar while the mixer is running.
  3. When all the sugar is added turn up the speed to high and beat until the mixture is thick, for about 10 minutes.
  4. In the mean time, shift together the flour, baking powder, salt, freshly ground anise seeds (use already ground if you must), and lemon zest.
  5. When the sugar/egg mixture is ready, slowly dump in the flour mixture on low speed. Mix until just combined, you don’t want to over mix.
  6. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees.
  7. The dough will be on the soft side. It’s not easy to scoop like chocolate chip cookie dough, so your best bet is to pipe the cookies using a gallon sized plastic bag with a pipping tip attached. Pipe the cookies onto a sheet pan lined with parchment (lightly sprayed) or a Slipat. For more crisp cookies, try to keep the cookies small.
  8. Sprinkle some coarse sugar on top of the cookies right before you put them in the oven.
  9. Bake the cookie until firm about 10-12 minutes. I would recommend checking after 5 minutes. Keep in mind, every oven is different, so it’s best to find what works for you in regards to baking time.

Overall, I think this is a solid recipe. The anise flavor is good, not too strong, and I really like adding the Meyer lemon zest, it adds that extra something.

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